Wednesday, February 03, 2016

Mighty Fine Find

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Typecast135
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Post-Script: I installed a two-color ribbon purchased via Amazon, and noticed afterwards a bit of ink smudging happening, which you might have noticed in the typecast piece. I suspect it's the ribbon, not the typewriter. Late yesterday evening I felt I needed some typing therapy, and sat out in the patio room with the L.A.R.O.P. (Little Arse Roll of Paper) mounted to the wooden tray table, and did some stream-of-consciousness typing. Normally the imprint upon this thin automotive masking paper is rather faint, but with the combination of this typewriter and the smudgy ribbon, it gave a very dark impression - which impressed me!

I'm also aware, being the owner of a small collection of manual typewriters, that I really don't touch-type all that often on these machines. Part of the reason is because, for blog articles needing to be scanned, I treat each piece more as a finished work of letterpress, and so use a careful two-fingered method, so as to impart as clear of an imprint as possible. However, I get the sense that this SM9 might be a good candidate as a touch-typing machine, due to its snappy action and overall great condition. So that late-night L.A.R.O.P. session served as an opportunity to get a bit of manual touch-typing practice in, and it was a good experience. I am aware in doing so that my ring and pinkie fingers are in need of a bit of training; which can only happen with more practice.

Lacking a carrying case, I've been thinking about what to do when the time comes that I might want to transport it. Of course, one solution is, having a good assortment of portables, to simply use a smaller machine when desiring to type out and about. But still, there is the fact that this one will eventually get swapped out in usage rotation with another, and so storing it safely in my closet becomes an issue. I think I'll go do some more thrift/antique store shopping and find one of those hard-cased Samsonite suitcases, that seem all too plentiful; perhaps I can manage to install some kind of makeshift bracket inside, for mounting to the typewriter's undercarriage. There is also the possibility that the hard case for this machine might still be at the store I purchased this from, perhaps mislaid, and so it would warrant a return visit.

Photos via Lumix G5.

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6 Comments:

Blogger Richard P said...

Great machine with a very attractive typeface. Enjoy!

11:12 AM  
Blogger Ted said...

GAS strikes! :D
And you've chosen a buxom German beauty to add to your corral - I know that joy!

That certainly is a nice, dark impression, too.

1:13 PM  
Blogger Bill M said...

Nothing beats fining a typewriter in pristine condition. It does have a nice typeface. Too bad you are way across the country or I'd buy the Techno one.

4:32 PM  
Blogger rino breebaart said...

Looks great, and in superb condition. congrats

6:21 PM  
Blogger teeritz said...

Great find, Joe! The SM9 is a true classic. Have perhaps considered making a case for it out of timber? The base would probably have to be the size of that table in the first picture, and I suspect that some strategically glued-in pieces of rubber mouldings would hold the machine in place when carried. Sure, it would be quite a job, but it would look quite nifty when completed.
Of course, the easier option is to head back to the store to see if the original case is somewhere tucked away.
Either way, very nice score, sir!

7:04 PM  
Blogger Joe V said...

Teeritz, thank you for the idea of the custom built case. I was thinking along those lines, or perhaps looking for a new hard tool case of the right dimensions.

But my thrift store hunting paid off, as you'll see in the next installment, to be posted tomorrow.

7:21 PM  

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~Joe

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